Category: "Health"

Ethiopia - Why family planning saves lives

November 20th, 2010

Ethiopia - Why family planning saves lives

New projects across Ethiopia are aiming to increase access to contraception and improve obstetric care. Competition runner-up Stephanie Hegarty explains

On the top floor of a crumbling four-storey building in downtown Addis Ababa, Birhani Haile holds the floor in front of a 30-strong audience. "I was a housemaid when I became pregnant," she says. "Unmarried and afraid to be found out, I took some pills to get rid of it. But they were pills for a cow." She woke up in the night, vomiting blood and bleeding heavily. "I went to a man who said he was familiar with this case. He gave me more pills but they were for malaria." She was lucky to survive.

In 2005, a year before Haile's desperate effort to abort her pregnancy, the Ethiopian government liberalised abortion laws. This effectively made treatment free and available to all women. But in a country where one third of pregnancies are thought to be unwanted, backstreet abortions continue to happen.


Read More from The Guardian

Doctors in India dare death to save Ethiopian national

November 20th, 2010

Doctors in India dare death to save Ethiopian national

His doctors had given up hope as his condition deteriorated with each passing day. But 64-year-old Worku Hassen, an Ethiopian national, was a fighter. From a losing battle against thyroid cancer which damaged his spine to a paralytic attack, Hassen braved it all with a smile. His strong will to live and positive approach gave doctors the confidence to put him through a thrombolysis — treatment for clearing blood clots — soon after the surgery for thyroid cancer.

Read more: from The Times of India

Ethiopia - Wolkite to get a new hospital

October 26th, 2010

Ethiopia - Wolkite to get a new hospital

By Staff Reporter

Source: Capital

The Guraghe Development Association in Ethiopia is going to construct a state-of-the-art hospital with an outlay of 90 million birr in Gubre sub-city of Wolkite town, Guraghe Zone of the Southern Ethiopian People’s State.

A corner stone was laid on October 3, by Tewodros Adhanom, Minister of Health, to launch the construction of the hospital that is expected to serve people that reside within 60 kilometers of radius.

During the corner stone laying ceremony, the minister expressed his delight over the commitment of the public to the realization of the project.
He said the ministry is working hard to expand health services across the nation and that such projects would help enable the achievement of its goals.

Wellela Mohammed, Public Relations Officer with the association, told Capital that his association secured about 230 million birr from pledges. According to him, the association is also planning to build three cultural centers that reflect the history and culture of the Guraghe people in Wolkite, Tiya and Addis Ababa.
The association is also going to construct an office complex to be used as its headquarters in Wolkite Town.

The Guraghe Development Association is going to construct a state-of-the-art hospital with an outlay of 90 million birr in Gubre sub-city of Wolkite town, Guraghe Zone of the Southern Ethiopian People’s State.

A corner stone was laid on October 3, by Tewodros Adhanom, Minister of Health, to launch the construction of the hospital that is expected to serve people that reside within 60 kilometers of radius.

During the corner stone laying ceremony, the minister expressed his delight over the commitment of the public to the realization of the project.

He said the ministry is working hard to expand health services across the nation and that such projects would help enable the achievement of its goals.

Wellela Mohammed, Public Relations Officer with the association, told Capital that his association secured about 230 million birr from pledges. According to him, the association is also planning to build three cultural centers that reflect the history and culture of the Guraghe people in Wolkite, Tiya and Addis Ababa.

The association is also going to construct an office complex to be used as its headquarters in Wolkite Town.

Ethiopia wants Indian hospitals as healthcare hub for Africa

June 20th, 2010
Fortis Healthcase Photo website

Ethiopia wants Indian hospitals as healthcare hub for Africa


Indo-Asian News Service

Impressed with some of India's private hospitals and the quality of healthcare they provide, Ethiopia wants them to open branches in that country so that they become a medical hub for entire Africa.

An Ethiopian delegation was in India this week with the twin aim of learning from India's health sector and small and medium enterprises.

"We felt that it will mutually benefit Ethiopians and the Indian private sector if they come to Ethiopia, especially Addis Ababa, and open branches, so that they attract not only Ethiopians but also other Africans," Redwan Hussien, head of the delegation.

The delegation, which included the health minister of the Addis Ababa city administration, met representatives of private hospital chains like Fortis Healthcare and Moolchand Healthcare.

"In the last seven-eight years, we have been growing at double digits and the middle class has been booming, so people can afford to go out of the country for medical treatment," said Hussien, a senior official in the city administration.

Addis Ababa, a city of 3.3 million, is also home to a substantial number of foreigners. It is the headquarters of the African Union and other international institutions. "Since Ethiopian Airlines is a major African airways, Addis Ababa is also a major transit point for Africans from other countries," said Hussien.

But there is no equivalent level of specialized medical treatment available inside the country. "Most people travel to South Africa, or Bangkok or come all the way to India," he said.

After discussions with private health providers, Hussien said that "Fortis Bangalore were really interested in going to Addis Ababa."

A memorandum of understanding is being drafted and may be signed soon.

Hussien said space will be given in an existing Ethiopian hospital to set up a specialized treatment unit. Also, Indian doctors will be teaching their Ethiopian counterparts as part of the transfer of technology.

On the small and medium enterprises sector, Ethiopia is also looking towards Indian trainers to come to Africa. "We want Indian experts to come and teach in about 4-5 areas that we have drawn up," he said.

The delegation also met with the Mayor of Delhi Prithviraj Sawhney and invited him to visit Ethiopia.

U.S. government to invest 387 million to support Ethiopia's Health Care Sector

June 11th, 2010

U.S. government to invest 387 million to support Ethiopia's Health Care Sector

Source: US Embassy

In 2010 the United States will invest U.S. $387 million to support the health care sector in Ethiopia.

Assistance is provide through the President’s Emergency Program for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the Agency for International Development’s (USAID) health programs, the President’s Malaria Initiative and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), among others.
The United States’ programs are aligned with Ethiopia’s five-year Health Sector Development Plan.

The U.S. government is strongly committed to the global fight against HIV and AIDS. Under PEPFAR, the U.S. has committed approximately U.S. $32 billion towards HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria programs worldwide. Ethiopia is a major recipient of PEPFAR support and has already received nearly U.S. $1.52 billion to support its comprehensive HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and care programs.

The United States has made significant investments in Ethiopia’s health sector infrastructure through the construction and renovation of hospitals, regional laboratories, health centers and pharmaceutical warehouses.

Highlights of U.S. investment in Ethiopia’s health care sector include (but are not limited to):

  • The U.S. provides Ethiopia with U.S. $128 million in support for strengthening health services, including the Ethiopian Health Management Information System, access to care for HIV and TB patients, laboratory facilities, and epidemic response.
  • The U.S. has provided financial and technical support to the Ethiopia’s national Health Extension Program, trained 17,600 health extension workers and supervisors, and provided technical support to 550 health centers around the country.
  • The U.S., in an effort to support Ethiopia’s child survival interventions, has improved access to safe drinking water, sanitation and hygiene in four major regions of Ethiopia (Oromiya, Amhara, SNNPR, and Tigray).
  • The U.S. is funding a 2010 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey to support monitoring and evaluation needs by tracking changes in health indicators. The survey will collect data on family health, including immunization and the prevalence and treatment of diarrhea and other diseases.
  • The U.S. extended diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus vaccines to 850,000 infants, and over 1.1 million Ethiopian children under five received vitamin A supplements in 2009.
  • The U.S. also helped establish new financial systems at 66 government hospitals and 782 health centers. In 2009, 28 hospitals and 22 health centers received automated health management information systems.
  • The U.S. helped build sex-segregated latrines and hand-washing facilities in 1,152 schools, benefitting 487,896 female students, teachers and school principles.
  • More than 900,000 HIV infected and affected adults and children receive care and there are 186,000 people receiving antiretroviral therapy with support from the U.S. government. Maintaining a strong emphasis on prevention has resulted in over 6 million people being tested for HIV in 2009.
  • The U.S. supports pharmaceutical infrastructure and provides essential drugs and supplies as part of an overall U.S. $200 million investment. The equipment will help to strengthen Ethiopia’s capacity to safely distribute drugs and supplies, including those for HIV/AIDS.
  • The U.S. continues to carry out malaria-control interventions and distribute vital commodities to vulnerable Ethiopian populations.